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Bedrock Mapping


New Brunswick contains a diversity of bedrock types that range from 1 billion years to 200 million years old. Geology maps showing the regional distribution and structure of these rocks are produced by the Geological Surveys Branch (GSB) of the Department of Natural Resources. The maps play a crucial role in attracting mineral and hydrocarbon exploration to the province.

Objective

The GSB conducts the Government’s Bedrock Mapping Program. The program’s key objective is to produce a set of standardized, high-quality digital maps covering all of New Brunswick at scales of 1:20 000 and 1:50 000.

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Activities

Bedrock mapping is a dynamic and ongoing process. The GSB regularly updates maps and other components of its geoscientific databases to incorporate new geological information and recent mineral discoveries.

Bedrock geology maps are used to:

  • to interpret the geologic evolution of the New Brunswick Appalachians;
  • as essential tools in the exploration for mineral and hydrocarbon deposits;
  • to evaluate groundwater resources;
  • to help determine appropriate locations for highways, pipelines, and waste disposal and heavy industry sites; and
  • as the geological framework for environmental assessments, land use plans, forest inventory databases, and similar applications.
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Current Projects

Each year the Geological Surveys Branch initiates geoscientific field projects to serve as a basis for mineral and petroleum exploration and for land-use planning in New Brunswick. Field projects are conducted under our Bedrock Mapping, Surficial Mapping, Metallic Mineral Deposits, Industrial Minerals, Hydrocarbon Resources, Geochemistry and Coastal Mapping programs.

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Bedrock Nomenclature

The Bedrock Nomenclature of New Brunswick includes detailed descriptions of all lithostratigraphic and intrusive units adopted by the Geological Surveys Branch to denote rock units in the Province. No attempt has been made to classify the units into formal and informal categories as defined in the North American Stratigraphic Code (1983). Descriptions of bedrock units in use in the Province are available in the Bedrock Lexicon.

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Maps

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Presentations

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Related Publications

The following is a list of some bedrock mapping publications. Further information can be accessed from the geoscience publications page:

  • BARR, S.M. and WHITE, C.E. 1999. Field relations, petrology and structure of neoproterozoic rocks in the Caledonian Highlands, Southern New Brunswick. Geological Survey of Canada Bulletin, 530, 101 p.
  • BARR, S.M. and WHITE, C.E. 2001. The Kingston Group: a redefined Silurian stratigraphic unit in southern New Brunswick. In Current Research 2000. Edited by B.M.W. Carroll. New Brunswick Department of Natural Resources and Energy, Minerals and Energy Division, Mineral Resource Report 2001-4, pp. 1-14.
  • CARROLL, J.I. 2003. Geology of the Kedgwick, Gounamitz River, States Brook and Menneval map areas (NTS 21 O/11, 21 O/12, 21 O/13 and 21 O/14), Restigouche County, New Brunswick. In Current Research 2002. Compiled and Edited by B.M.W. Carroll. New Brunswick Department of Natural Resources; Minerals, Policy and Planning Division, Mineral Resource Report 2003-4, pp. 23-57.
  • FYFFE, L. R. 2001. Stratigraphy and geochemistry of Ordovician volcanic rocks of the Eel River area, west-central New Brunswick, Atlantic geology, 37, pp. 81-101.
  • FYFFE, L. R., MCCUTCHEON, S. R. and WILSON, R. A. 1997. Miramichi-Tetagouche group stratagraphic relationships, Bathurst Mining Camp, Northern New Brunswick In Current Research 1996. Edited by B.M.W. Carroll. New Brunswick Department of Natural Resources and Energy, Minerals and Energy Division, Mineral Resource Report 97-4, pp. 37-51.
  • FYFFE, L.R., PICKERILL, R.K. and STRINGER, P. 1999. Stratigraphy, sedimentology and structure of the Oak Bay and Waweig formations, Mascarene Basin: implications for the paleotectonic evolution of southwestern New Brunswick. Atlantic Geology, 35, pp. 59-84.
  • JOHNSON, S. C. 2001. Contrasting geology in the Pocologan River and Long Reach areas: implications for the New River belt and correlations in southern New Brunswick and Maine. Atlantic Geology, 37, pp. 61-79. JOHNSON, S.C. and MCLEOD, M.J. 1996. The New River Belt: A unique segment along the western margin of the Avalon composite terrane, southern New Brunswick,. Geological Society of America, Special Paper 304, pp. 149-164.
  • MCLEOD, M.J., RUITENBERG, A.A. and KROGH, T.E. 1992. Geology and U-Pb geochronology of the Annidale Group, southern New Brunswick: Lower Ordovician volcanic and sedimentary rocks formed near the southeastern margin of Iapetus Ocean. Atlantic Geology, 28, pp. 181-192.
  • ST. PETER, C. 1978. Geology of parts of Restigouche, Victoria and Madawaska counties, northwestern New Brunswick, N.T.S. 21 N/8, 21 N/9, 21 O/5, 21 O/11, 21 O/14. New Brunswick Department of Natural Resources, Mineral Resources Branch, Report of Investigation 17, 69 p.
  • VAN STAAL, C.R., FYFFE, L.R., LANGTON, J.P. and MCCUTCHEON, S.R. 1992. The Ordovician Tetagouche Group, Bathurst Camp, northern New Brunswick, Canada: history, tectonic setting and distribution of massive-sulfide deposits. Exploration and Mining Geology, 1, pp. 93-103.
  • WALKER, J.A. and MCCUTCHEON, S.R. 1995. Siluro-Devonian stratigraphy of the Chaleur Bay Synclinorium, northern New Brunswick. In Current Research 1994. Compiled and Edited by S.A.A. Merlini. New Brunswick Department of Natural Resources and Energy, Minerals and Energy Division, Miscellaneous Report 18, pp. 225-244.
  • WHALEN, J.B. 1993. Geology, petrography and geochemistry of Appalachian granites in New Brunswick and Gaspsie, Quebec. Geological Survey of Canada, Bulletin 436, 124 p.
  • WILSON, R. A., KAMO, S., and BURDEN, E. T. 2005. Geology of Val d'Amour Formation: revisiting the type area of the Dalhousie Group, northern New Brunswick. In Geological Investigations in New Brunswick for 2004. Edited by G. L. Martin. New Brunswick Department of Natural Resources; Minerals, Policy and Planning Division, Mineral Resource Report 2005-1, pp. 167-212.
  • WILSON, R.A. and KAMO, S.L. 1997. Geology of the Micmac Mountain-Mount Bill Gray area (NTS 21 O/08d), southwestern Bathurst Mining Camp, New Brunswick. In Current Research 1996. Edited by B.M.W. Carroll. New Brunswick Department of Natural Resources and Energy, Minerals and Energy Division, Mineral Resource Report 97-4, pp. 273-298.
  • WILSON, R.A., BURDEN, E.T., BERTRAND, R., ASSELIN, E. and MCCRACKEN, A.D. 2004. Stratigraphy and tectono-sedimentary evolution of the late Ordovician to Middle Devonian Gasp Belt in northern New Brunswick: evidence from the Restigouche area. Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences 41: pp. 527-551.
  • WILSON, R.A., FYFFE, L.R., MCNICOLL, V. and WODICKA, N. 1999. Lithogeochemistry, petrography and geochronology of Ordovician rocks in the Big Bald Mountain area (NTS 21/01), Bathurst Mining Camp, New Brunswick. In Current Research 1998 Carroll, B.M.W. (editor). New Brunswick Department of Natural Resources, Minerals and Energy Division, Mineral Resource Report 99-4, pp. 89-142.

For additional information, please contact North or South

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