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Legislative Assembly of New Brunswick
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Part 2 - King George III and Queen Charlotte


The visitor's attention is likely to turn next to the two large portraits, one on either side of the throne. These are replicas of paintings by Sir Joshua Reynolds of King George III and his consort, Queen Charlotte. Both have undergone extensive restoration.

George III had reigned for 24 years and had 36 years left to live when New Brunswick was separated from Nova Scotia and created a separate province in 1784. The province was named for his family's ancestral seat, Brunswick, in Germany. Previously, it had been known as Sunbury County, Nova Scotia.

The throne, set on a dais under a canopy bearing a carving of the royal coat of arms, serves as such only when the lieutenant-governor enters the house to deliver the Speech from the Throne, which opens a session of the legislature, to perform the formal function of giving royal assent to bills, or to prorogue the legislature. During the legislative session, it is the speaker's chair and is occupied by the member elected by members of the Legislative Assembly to preside.

The speaker's chair and the original clerk's desk were rescued from the fire that destroyed the old legislative building known as Province Hall.

Traditionally, the premier, cabinet and members of the government party are seated on the speaker's right, while opposition members are seated on the left, beneath the visitors' gallery.

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